US briefing: Nielsen quits, Trump taxes, elections in Israel and India

Open face of Trump’s fringe arrangement out following 15 months

Kirstjen Nielsen has surrendered as Donald Trump’s secretary of country security following 15 months as the essence of a portion of his most questionable approaches. Nielsen, who went with Trump on a visit to the fringe a week ago, has confronted the president’s wrath on a few events, and was apparently rebuked for her execution at a bureau meeting the previous spring. Kevin McAleenan, as of now the US Customs and Border Protection chief, will fill her job while a changeless substitution is picked.

Individuals sneaking. The exchange individuals pirating is blasting, with the profile of vagrants moving from single guys to Central American families. What’s more, Trump’s movement crackdown is halfway to fault, as Sarah Kinosian reports from Guatemala.

Democrats battle for arrival of Mueller report and Trump government forms

Democrats kept up weight on the Trump organization throughout the end of the week, as they kept on requesting the arrival of the president’s expense forms, just as the full content of the Mueller report. The acting White House head of staff, Mick Mulvaney, said on Sunday Democrats would “never” see Trump’s expense forms, blaming the seat for the House available resources advisory group, Richard Neal, of playing out a “political trick” by requesting six years of profits from the IRS.

One-sided Barr? Jerry Nadler, the seat of the House legal executive council, said he was all the while hanging tight for the lawyer general, William Barr, to discharge Robert Mueller’s full report on Russian decision interfering, cautioning that Barr – a Trump representative – was “a one-sided individual [and] a specialist of the organization”.

Israel gets ready for decision seen as submission on Netanyahu

Israelis will go to the surveys on Tuesday in a decision generally observed – at home and abroad – as a submission on the 10-year standard of the head administrator, Benjamin Netanyahu. In the event that he is re-chosen, “Bibi” will more likely than not become Israel’s longest-serving pioneer. His supporters state he has kept Israelis safe and directed a solid economy, yet commentators state the nation has swung ever further to one side under his authority, mistreating a large number of Palestinians and covering any dynamic endeavors for harmony.

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This article titled “US briefing: Nielsen quits, Trump taxes, elections in Israel and India” was written by Tim Walker, for theguardian.com on Monday 8th April 2019 17.46 UTC

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Good morning, I’m Tim Walker with today’s essential stories.

Public face of Trump’s border policy out after 15 months

Kirstjen Nielsen has resigned as Donald Trump’s secretary of homeland security after 15 months as the face of some of his most controversial policies. Nielsen, who accompanied Trump on a visit to the border last week, has faced the president’s ire on several occasions, and was reportedly castigated for her performance at a cabinet meeting last spring. Kevin McAleenan, currently the US Customs and Border Protection commissioner, will fill her role while a permanent replacement is chosen.

Democrats fight for release of Mueller report and Trump tax returns

The White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney
The White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, says Democrats will ‘never’ see Trump’s tax returns.
Photograph: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA

Democrats kept up pressure on the Trump administration over the weekend, as they continued to demand the release of the president’s tax returns, as well as the full text of the Mueller report. The acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, said on Sunday Democrats would “never” see Trump’s tax returns, accusing the chair of the House ways and means committee, Richard Neal, of performing a “political stunt” by demanding six years of returns from the IRS.

  • Biased Barr? Jerry Nadler, the chair of the House judiciary committee, said he was still waiting for the attorney general, William Barr, to release Robert Mueller’s full report on Russian election meddling, warning that Barr – a Trump appointee – was “a biased person [and] an agent of the administration.

Israel prepares for election seen as referendum on Netanyahu

Dog walkers argue beneath a Netanyahu campaign billboard in Tel Aviv.
Dog walkers argue beneath a Netanyahu campaign billboard in Tel Aviv.
Photograph: Ariel Schalit/AP

Israelis will go to the polls on Tuesday in an election widely seen – at home and abroad – as a referendum on the 10-year rule of the prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. If he is re-elected, “Bibi” will almost certainly become Israel’s longest-serving leader. His supporters say he has kept Israelis safe and presided over a strong economy, but critics say the country has swung ever further to the right under his leadership, oppressing millions of Palestinians and burying any progressive efforts for peace.

  • Beto on Bibi. The Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke said on Sunday Netanyahu was “racist”, citing the prime minister’s election pact to form a governing coalition with Israel’s far-right, ultranationalist parties.

  • Master storyteller. Ayelet Gundar-Goshen says the secret to Netanyahu’s success is his skill as a storyteller – and the narrative he has presented to Israelis is a simple one of good versus evil.

World’s biggest democracy heads to the polls

A woman wearing a mask of Modi at a recent campaign rally.
A woman wearing a mask of Modi at a recent campaign rally.
Photograph: Anuwar Hazarika/Reuters

More than one-eighth of the world’s population will have a chance to cast their votes for the next government of India in the coming weeks, when the world’s biggest democracy holds its election over seven separate days from 11 April to 19 May, at a cost of approximately $6.5bn. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata party is expected to emerge on top again, thanks to a new jobs quota, cash handouts to farmers and the conflict with Pakistan, despite several recent opposition victories in state elections.

  • Symbolic vote. Approximately 300 million Indians are unable to read, so each political party is assigned a small symbol to identify them on the ballot paper. The BJP’s symbol is a lotus flower, while the main opposition, Congress, is a hand.

Crib sheet

Shades of black: a series on the politics of skin colour

 

 

For a new series, Shades of Black, the Guardian asked 27 black women to speak out on colorism: the discrimination based on skin complexion that exists in the black community. Today, Dream McClinton asks whether colorism is to blame for the low marriage rate among darker skinned black women, while Stephanie Yeboah opens up about her toxic love affair with skin lighteners.

Must-reads

Can you go through an entire day using only GoT-branded products? Probably.
Can you go through an entire day using only GoT-branded products? Probably.
Composite: Joff Lee; primark.co.uk; factoryent.com; Etsy.com; darkhorse.com; valyriansteel.com; Amazon

24 hours in Game of Thrones merchandise

With the final season of Game of Thrones mere days away, Rich Pelley fills a whole 24 hours with nothing but Westeros-themed merchandise, from pulling on his Winter is Coming underpants to a nightcap dram of Oban Little Bay Night’s Watch Reserve.

The women fighting back against killer robots

Jody Williams and Mary Wareham were leading campaigners in a global effort to ban landmines, for which Williams won a Nobel prize. Now, they tell Melissa Chan, they’re trying to halt the rise of lethal autonomous weapon systems, or Laws – AKA killer robots.

Atlantic City: ‘Trump turned this place into a ghost town’

Brian Rose’s photographs comprise a portrait of the broken city behind Trump’s billionaire boasts. “When Trump failed with his casinos,” Rose tells Thomas Hobbs, “he turned Atlantic City into a ghost town. His legacy still haunts the boardwalk.”

Opinion

Barack Obama says he worries Democrats are becoming a “circular firing squad”, attacking their own for “straying from purity”. But Bhaskar Sunkara says the 44th president is stuck in the past – and strident progressivism is the future of the party.

Incrementalism during the Obama years were small steps to nowhere, ones that far from cementing a new progressive majority actually helped open the door to the populist right.

Sport

The Golden State Warriors would be far from the first franchise to relocate, but by moving across the Bay from their unlovely but beloved Oakland home to wealthy, white San Francisco, the team is sacrificing some of what made it great, says Devin Gordon.

Baylor clung on to their lead in the NCAA women’s championship game on Sunday night, beating Notre Dame 82-81 in a nail-biter, to claim their third title of the century.

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• This article was corrected on 8 April to delete a reference to migration into the US being at its highest level in decades. In fact, the total number of migrants reaching the US southern border is significantly down from its peak in the early 2000s.

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